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TCU Historic Costume Collection

The Department of Fashion Merchandising

The Fashion Merchandising program at TCU is uniquely structured to support a holistic approach to the fashion industry. The program covers fashion design, merchandising and marketing functions of the industry. The program at TCU is not focused on the retail end of the industry or logistics. The following courses are offered in each of the designated areas and some cross over all.

The TCU Historic Costume Collection

Mission:

The TCU Historic Costume Collection is a teaching collection housed in the Department of Fashion Merchandising on the TCU campus.  We strive to collect iconic pieces from each decade that have an important design element or are from a designer that was specifically iconic for that time. Within this teaching collection, each garment contains a teaching element that will be used in the classroom, and the collection will be reviewed every two years. Through the evaluation of the collection every two years, the collection will be kept up to date, especially with all of the changes occurring within the industry. The next goal will be to have it digitally accessible to the university and eventually the public.

Another main envision for the collection is to develop a specific collection dedicated to being the “Fort Worth Collection”. The main use of this section will be to archive items that represent important events in the greater Fort Worth area.

Vision for the Future:

Within this teaching collection, each garment will contain a teaching element that will be used in the classroom, and the collection will be reviewed every two years. Through the evaluation of the collection every two years, the collection will be kept up to date, especially with all of the changes occurring within the industry. Only approved students and faculty members within the fashion merchandising major are allowed physical access to the collection. As the collection continues to grow, contemporary decades will be added accordingly. There are future plans to make the collection digitally accessible to students within other majors. After this is accomplished, the next goal will be to have it digitally accessible to the public.

Cowtown Collection:

Another main envision for the collection will be to have a specific section dedicated to being the “Fort Worth Collection”. The main use of this section will be for items that have a Fort Worth focus and are centered around the city rather than specific decades.


Swimwear

 


Where the Wild Things Are

 


Walking TCU

Dr. Phil Hartman and his daughter Joan Hewatt Swaim have recently published the second edition of Walking TCU; A Historic Perspective.  In honor of this book launch the TCU Historic Costume Society has curated an exhibit of shoes that would have been worn when the various buildings were built.  The lace up boots were worn in the early 1910’s when Jarvis, Reed, and the Bailey buildings were built.  In the 1920’s the Erma Low build was built and men would have worn similar shoes to these Oxfords to class.  Finally we display some Orang flats and fake animal skin shoes to note the new technologies that were being applied to footwear as well as architecture of Clark and Sadler halls.  Below is more information about the shoes as well as information about the book.

https://calendar.tcu.edu/tcu_campus_store_401

https://www.tcupress.com/9780875658353/


TCU Research and Creative Activities

As part of FAME Technical and Creative Design course Camila del Valle created the original design for the dress.  This process required Camila to learn how to make a pattern through both draping and flat pattern techniques.  She then used a combination of these processes to develop a pattern and the muslin (prototype) displayed on the dress form.  Camila’s goal was to wear this dress to graduation, so she then had to grade the finished pattern to her measurements, make a new muslin, make adjustments and then construct the final garment in the gold fashion fabric that is pictured.


Costume or Couture?

Here are some vintage ideas for your Halloween 2023 costumes!


1970’s


1920’s

 


TCU 150th Fine Arts Spectrum

The Department of Fashion Merchandising presents

Fashion through the Decades


2022 Fine Arts Gala Display

 


The Communication of Hats

 

 


Summer Fun

 

 


Formal Beading

 

 


Denim

 


 

Luxury Designers

 


1950 Lace